MarineBio Conservation SocietySea Life News   :: ScienceDaily

Ancient Italian fossils reveal risk of parasitic infections due to climate change

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 15:53:14 EDT ~ In 2014, a team of researchers found that clams from the Holocene Epoch (that began 11,700 years ago) contained clues about how sea level rise due to climate change could foreshadow a rise in parasitic trematodes. Now, an international team has found that rising seas could be detrimental to human health on a much shorter time scale. Find out more...

Biological hydraulic system discovered in tuna fins

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:23:23 EDT ~ The unique system of hydraulic control of fins discovered in tuna indicates a new role for the lymphatic system in vertebrates. This natural mechanism may inspire designs for new 'smart' control surfaces with changeable shape and stiffness for both air and underwater unmanned vehicles. Find out more...

Elephant seals recognize each other by the rhythm of their calls

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:22:39 EDT ~ Every day, humans pick up on idiosyncrasies such as slow drawls, high-pitched squeaks, or hints of accents to put names to voices from afar. This ability may not be as unique as once thought, researchers report. They find that unlike all other non-human mammals, northern elephant seal males consider the spacing and timing of vocal pulses in addition to vocal tones when identifying the calls of their rivals. Find out more...

Could sharks help save shipping industry billions?

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 11:36:55 EDT ~ Whales, sharks, butterflies and lotus leaves might together hold the secret to saving the shipping industry millions and help save the planet, according to a marine biologist. Find out more...

'Sound' research shows slower boats may cause manatees more harm than good

Thu, 20 Jul 2017 09:53:58 EDT ~ Slower boat speeds reduce risks to manatees. Or do they? Not exactly, according to new research. In fact, the very laws enacted to slow down boats in manatee habitats may actually be doing more harm than good. Slowing down boats makes it more difficult for manatees to detect and locate approaching boats. An innovative alerting device is proving to deliver a better solution. Find out more...

Damming and lost connectivity for fish in Northeastern ecosystems

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 14:09:33 EDT ~ Fish that migrate between freshwater and sea ecosystems play a multitude of ecological roles. In the centuries since Europeans first colonized the Americas, damming and other disruptions to river connectivity have greatly decreased the migration opportunities of these species. A new article outlines the effects of lost habitat and river connectivity for these crucial fish. Find out more...

Shark scavenging helps reveal clues about human remains

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 11:50:46 EDT ~ Shark feeding habits are helping scientists identify marks on human bones found in the ocean. By analyzing shark scavenging behavior, researchers identified which marks were left behind by sharks, what species of sharks made the marks and where the feedings might have occurred. Find out more...

To swallow food, some sharks shrug their shoulders

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 22:18:49 EDT ~ Sophisticated X-ray imaging technology has allowed scientists to see that to keep food moving down toward the digestive tract, bamboo sharks use their shoulders to create suction. Find out more...

Did life begin on land rather than in the sea?

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 14:29:00 EDT ~ A new discovery pushes back the time for the emergence of microbial life on land by 580 million years and also bolsters a paradigm-shifting hypothesis that life began, not in the sea, but on land. Find out more...

One amino acid, a whale of a difference

Tue, 18 Jul 2017 08:45:24 EDT ~ A single amino-acid variation in a key receptor in whales may help explain why some species of cetaceans evolved sleek, muscular bodies to hunt fish and seals, while others grow to massive sizes by filter-feeding on large volumes of plankton, an international research team has found. Find out more...