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Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:17:35 EST ~ Researchers have discovered a planetary-scale tug-of-war between life, deep Earth and the upper atmosphere that is expressed in atmospheric nitrogen. Find out more...

Asthma attacks reduced in tree-lined urban neighborhoods

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:38:14 EST ~ People living in polluted urban areas are far less likely to be admitted to hospital with asthma when there are lots of trees in their neighborhood, a new study has found. Find out more...

Air quality atlas for Europe: Mapping the sources of fine particulate matter

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 09:25:50 EST ~ The European Commission published today an Air Quality Atlas for Europe. This new publication produced by the Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) helps to pave the way for targeted air quality measures by mapping the origins of fine particulate matter in Europe's largest cities. Find out more...

One in ten historic coastal landfill sites in England are at risk of erosion

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:52:57 EST ~ There are at least 1,215 historic coastal landfill sites in England, mostly clustered around estuaries with major cities, including Liverpool, London, and Newcastle on Tyne. An investigation by researchers finds that 122 sites are at risk of starting to erode into coastal waters by 2055 if not adequately protected. Find out more...

Shape of Lake Ontario generates white-out blizzards, study shows

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:53:13 EST ~ A 6-foot-wide snow blower mounted on a tractor makes a lot of sense when you live on the Tug Hill Plateau. Tug Hill, in upstate New York, is one of the snowiest places in the Eastern US and experiences some of the most intense snowstorms in the world. This largely rural region, just east of Lake Ontario, gets an average of 20 feet of snow a year, and a new report explains why. Find out more...

What counts as 'nature'? It all depends

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 12:45:14 EST ~ A psychology professor describes 'environmental generational amnesia' as the idea that each generation perceives the environment into which it's born, no matter how developed, urbanized or polluted, as the norm. And so what each generation comes to think of as 'nature' is relative, based on what it's exposed to. He argues that more frequent and meaningful interactions with nature can enhance our connection to -- and definition of -- the natural world. Find out more...

People with certain blood types are at increased risk of heart attack during periods of pollution

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 15:55:36 EST ~ Individuals who have A, B, or AB blood types have an elevated risk of having a heart attack during periods of significant air pollution, compared to those with the O blood type, according to new research. Find out more...

Study of impact of climate change on temperatures suggests more deaths unless action taken

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 19:50:19 EST ~ The largest study to date of the potential temperature-related health impacts of climate change has shown that as global temperatures rise, the surge in death rates during hot weather outweighs any decrease in deaths in cold weather, with many regions facing sharp net increases in mortality rates. Find out more...

Exposure to benzene during pregnancy: a pilot study raises concerns in British Columbia

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 09:54:35 EST ~ New research reveals that 29 pregnant women living near natural-gas hydraulic fracturing sites had a median concentration of a benzene biomarker in their urine that was 3.5 times higher than that found in women from the general Canadian population. Find out more...

Green roofs to reduce the effects of climate change

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 11:39:38 EST ~ It would be necessary to have between 207 and 740 hectares of green roofs in a city like Seville (Spain), depending on the scenario that is contemplated, to reduce the effects of climate change in relation to the maximum temperature rises of between 1.5 and 6 C that are estimated by the end of the century. This would require between 11 and 40 percent of the buildings in the city. Find out more...