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Penguins, starfish, whales: Which animals will win and lose in a warming Antarctic?

Thu, 17 Jan 2019 09:05:04 EST ~ Using risk assessments, like those used for setting occupational safety limits in the workplace, researchers determined the winners and losers of climate change in the Antarctic. They show that marine animals associated with sea ice for food or breeding, such as some whales and penguins, are most at risk from the effects of climate change, while seafloor predators and open-water feeding animals like starfish and jellyfish will benefit from the opening up of new habitat. Find out more...

Emperor penguins' first journey to sea

Thu, 17 Jan 2019 09:04:41 EST ~ New research reveals the previously unknown behaviors of juvenile Emperor penguins in their critical early months when they leave their birth colony and first learn how to swim, dive, and find food. Find out more...

Marine mammals and sea turtles recovering after Endangered Species Act protection

Wed, 16 Jan 2019 14:06:26 EST ~ More than three-quarters of marine mammal and sea turtle populations have significantly increased after listing of the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), according to a new study. Find out more...

Ocean giant gets a health check: Combination blood, tissue test reveals whale shark diets

Wed, 16 Jan 2019 09:06:36 EST ~ Whale sharks, the world's largest fish, likely endure periods of starvation and may eat more plants than previously thought, according to the first results of a new health check. Ocean scientists now have a powerful, simple tool to discover the diets, migrations, and conservation needs of this endangered species. Find out more...

Climate change during ancient Indus Civilization

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 13:29:01 EST ~ New research on the '4.2 ka BP climatic event' provides rich insights into how rainfall in the northwest of South Asia changed over the critical period between 5400 and 3000 years ago. Find out more...

Using satellites to measure rates of ice mass loss in glaciers

Tue, 15 Jan 2019 12:44:39 EST ~ Researchers have investigated all glacial areas in South America in more detail than ever before, from the tropical areas to the subpolar regions. Their two major findings are that the highest rate of mass loss is in the Patagonian ice sheet, and that the glaciers in the tropics have lost considerably less mass than previously projected, although this is not the good news which it might appear at first sight. Find out more...

Antarctica losing six times more ice mass annually now than 40 years ago

Mon, 14 Jan 2019 16:11:50 EST ~ Antarctica experienced a sixfold increase in yearly ice mass loss between 1979 and 2017, according to a new study. Glaciologists additionally found that the accelerated melting caused global sea levels to rise more than half an inch during that time. Find out more...

Antarctic ice sheet could suffer a one-two climate punch

Mon, 14 Jan 2019 11:42:37 EST ~ Variations in the axial tilt of the Earth have significant implications for the rise and fall of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, the miles-deep blanket of ice that locks up huge volumes of water that, if melted, would dramatically elevate sea level and alter the world's coastlines. New research matches the geologic record of Antarctica's ice with the periodic astronomical motions of the Earth. Find out more...

Upper-ocean warming is changing the global wave climate, making waves stronger

Mon, 14 Jan 2019 08:28:47 EST ~ Sea level rise puts coastal areas at the forefront of the impacts of climate change, but new research shows they face other climate-related threats as well. Scientists found that the energy of ocean waves has been growing globally, and they found a direct association between ocean warming and the increase in wave energy. Find out more...

Oceans are warming even faster than previously thought

Thu, 10 Jan 2019 14:18:11 EST ~ Heat trapped by greenhouse gases is raising ocean temperatures faster than previously thought, concludes an analysis of four recent ocean heating observations. The results provide further evidence that earlier claims of a slowdown or 'hiatus' in global warming over the past 15 years were unfounded. Find out more...