MarineBio Conservation SocietyInvasive Species News   :: ScienceDaily

Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:16:24 EST ~ A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. Monitoring the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit, researchers found the bat is responsible for only some, and could be managed effectively without the need to cull. Find out more...

Conservation areas help birdlife adapt to climate change

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:16:15 EST ~ A warming climate is pushing organisms towards the circumpolar areas and mountain peaks. A recently conducted study on changes in bird populations reveals that protected areas slow down the north-bound retreat of species. Find out more...

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:24:17 EST ~ The physical presence of trails has less impact on forest birds than how frequently the trails are used by people, finds the first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans. This is also the case when trails have been used for decades, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to human activity. To minimize disturbance, people should avoid roaming from designated pathways. Find out more...

New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:22:08 EST ~ New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage. Find out more...

Marine Protected Areas overlook a large fraction of biodiversity hotspots

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 09:13:20 EST ~ Around 75 percent of marine biodiversity in Finnish waters is left unprotected, reveals a performance assessment of the country's current Marine Protected Area network. Increasing protection by just 1 percent in the most biodiverse areas could double conservation of the most important species. In addition to identifying areas of high conservation value, the methodology can also be used in ecosystem-based marine spatial planning and impact avoidance, including siting of wind energy, aquaculture and other human activities. Find out more...

Amazon forests failing to keep up with climate change

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 09:13:17 EST ~ New research has assessed the impact of global warming on thousands of tree species across the Amazon to discover the winners and losers from 30 years of climate change. The analysis found the effects of climate change are altering the rainforest's composition of tree species but not quickly enough to keep up with the changing environment. Find out more...

Florida monarch butterfly populations have dropped 80 percent since 2005

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 09:12:59 EST ~ A 37-year survey of monarch populations in North Central Florida shows that caterpillars and butterflies have been declining since 1985 and have dropped by 80 percent since 2005. Find out more...

How invasive earthworm feces is altering US soils

Tue, 06 Nov 2018 12:14:13 EST ~ Asian jumping earthworms are carving out territory all over the US Midwest and East Coast, leaving in their wake changed soils that are just beginning to be studied. Find out more...

Tropical mountain species in the crosshairs of climate change

Tue, 06 Nov 2018 11:16:03 EST ~ Lack of varied seasons and temperatures in tropical mountains have led to species that are highly adapted to their narrow niches, creating the right conditions for new species to arise in these areas, according to a new study. Still, the same traits that make tropical mountains among the most biodiverse ecosystems on Earth also make the species that live there more vulnerable to rapid climate changes, the study finds. Find out more...

More affordable and effective conservation of species

Mon, 05 Nov 2018 12:25:26 EST ~ No one had reported seeing the strange creature -- a cross between a bear and a monkey -- since before the Great Depression. Then, this past summer, an amateur biologist stumbled upon the presumed-extinct Wondiwoi tree kangaroo while trekking through Papua New Guinea. The revelation underscored how little we still know about the natural world -- a major obstacle to conservation. Find out more...