MarineBio Conservation SocietyInvasive Species News   :: ScienceDaily

Exposure to water that is both salty and fresh is key to future success

Wed, 17 Jan 2018 13:54:20 EST ~ According to Charles Darwin the ability to adapt to new conditions is essential for survival of species. The capacity to cope with altered conditions is becoming increasingly important in the face of climate change. New evidence on salt water tolerance in spawning migrating pike from the Baltic Sea suggests that not being adapted to specific local environments may promote persistence in an uncertain, rapidly changing world. Find out more...

Great scat! Bears -- not birds -- are the chief seed dispersers in Alaska

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 13:12:59 EST ~ In southeastern Alaska, brown and black bears are plentiful because of salmon. Their abundance also means they are the primary seed dispersers of berry-producing shrubs, according to a new study. Find out more...

Europe's lost forests: Coverage has halved over 6,000 years

Tue, 16 Jan 2018 11:11:21 EST ~ Research shows more than half of the forests across Europe have been lost over the past 6,000 years. Find out more...

Species identification in the water bottle

Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:51:08 EST ~ Environmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, researchers systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the monitoring of water bodies. Find out more...

Marijuana farms expose spotted owls to rat poison in northwest California

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 14:16:57 EST ~ Spotted owls and barred owls are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, with illegal marijuana farms the most likely source point, according to a new study. Proposition 64, which legalized recreational marijuana in the state, went into effect this month and is expected to intensify the issue. Find out more...

Protecting corridors is critical to preserving genetic diversity in tigers, and mizimising extinction, study finds

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 10:14:16 EST ~ Tigers have lost 95% of their historical range, and what remains is highly fragmented. According to a new study, high traffic roads and densely populated urban areas are a severe impediment to tiger movement between fragments. Unplanned development in the future will result in loss of connectivity and an increased possibility of extinction for several tiger populations. To ensure future persistence, tiger populations need to be managed as a network of protected areas connected by corridors. Find out more...

Closed marriage: An orchid that never blooms

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 10:13:43 EST ~ A flower identified as Lecanorchis nigricans has been revealed to be a different identity, Lecanorchis nigricans var. patipetala. Both species are self-pollinating, but the flowers of the true L. nigricans never open. Find out more...

New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 09:07:00 EST ~ Eight years after the discovery of a new primate species in Myanmar, scientists have released a new report revealing how the 'snubby' is faring. Find out more...

Hiding from a warmer climate in the forest

Thu, 11 Jan 2018 08:49:41 EST ~ Global warming threatens forest plants adapted to cooler temperatures. An international team of scientists have unraveled where these species could survive within colder spots in the same forest. The findings can help to understand the effect of climate change on forest biodiversity and what we can do to protect it. Find out more...

Dramatic decline in genetic diversity of Northwest salmon

Wed, 10 Jan 2018 14:13:12 EST ~ Columbia River Chinook salmon have lost as much as two-thirds of their genetic diversity, researchers have found. The researchers reached this conclusion after extracting DNA from scores of bone samples -- some harvested as many as 7,000 years ago -- and comparing them to the DNA of Chinook currently swimming in the Snake and Columbia rivers. The work is 'the first direct measure of reduced genetic diversity for Chinook salmon from the ancient to the contemporary period.' Find out more...