MarineBio Conservation SocietyInvasive Species News   :: ScienceDaily

eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:17:32 EST ~ When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key. The same is true for eliminating invasive species. Identifying their presence in a lake before they are abundant is vital. A recent study successfully used environmental DNA to detect invasive clams in California and Nevada lakes. Researchers believe this tool can help identify pests before they become a problem. Find out more...

Using eDNA to identify the breeding habitat of endangered species

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:37:53 EST ~ Using wide-ranging eDNA analysis combined with traditional collection survey methods, researchers have identified the breeding site of critically endangered fish species Acheilognathus typus in the mainstream of Omono River in Akita Prefecture, Japan. Find out more...

European forests might not be realizing their full potential

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 08:58:01 EST ~ European forest managers can have their cake and eat it, because according to a new study maximizing timber production in a forest does not necessarily have to come at a cost of reduced species diversity or the capacity to regulate climate change by the same forest. However most European forests fall well below their possible maximum levels of these three capacities. Find out more...

Gene drive technologies for ecosystem conservation: Use with care!

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 14:20:50 EST ~ Scientists working in the vanguard of new genetic technologies have issued a cautionary call to ensure that possible applications in conservation will only affect local populations. Experts have now examined the possible consequences of the accidental spread of existing self-propagating gene drive systems. Find out more...

Species in the north are more vulnerable to climate change

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 09:25:30 EST ~ For the first time, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that animals that live in climate zones at a safe distance from both the poles as well as the tropics have the most to gain from acclimating to changes in climate. The findings contradict previous research in the field. Find out more...

Genomic study explores evolution of gentle 'killer bees' in Puerto Rico

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 09:01:14 EST ~ A study of Puerto Rico's Africanized honey bees -- which are more docile than other so-called 'killer bees' -- shows they retain most of the genetic traits of their African honey bee ancestors, but that a few regions of their DNA have become more like those of European honey bees. These changes likely contributed to the bees' rapid evolution toward gentleness in Puerto Rico, a change that occurred within 30 years, and could spell hope for beekeeping in North America. Find out more...

Amazonian streams found teeming with fish species are lacking protection

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 09:24:07 EST ~ Hundreds of thousands of Amazonian streams are teeming with highly diverse populations of fish species, a new study reveals. Find out more...

Flower attracts insects by pretending to be a mushroom

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 09:20:41 EST ~ The mysterious flowers ofAspidistra elatiorare found on the southern Japanese island of Kuroshima. Until recently, scientists thought that A. elatior had the most unusual pollination ecology among all flowering plants, being pollinated by slugs and amphipods. However, direct observation of their ecosystem has revealed that they are mainly pollinated by fungus gnats, probably thanks to their resemblance to mushrooms. Find out more...

Microbiome transplants provide disease resistance in critically-endangered Hawaiian plant

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 14:23:40 EST ~ A team of researchers transplanted microbes to restore the health of a critically endangered Hawaiian plant that, until now, had been driven to extinction in the wild and only survived in managed greenhouses under heavy doses of fungicide. Find out more...

Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 10:42:10 EST ~ Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds. Find out more...