MarineBio Conservation SocietyGlobal Warming News   :: ScienceDaily

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:38:00 EST ~ New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. Find out more...

Evaluation of novel hybrid membranes for carbon capture

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 08:52:11 EST ~ Hybrid materials known as mixed matrix membranes are considered a promising approach to capture carbon dioxide and mitigate against global warming. These materials are derived from a polymer combined with porous nanoparticles. We show that materials prepared using porous organic polymers are resilient to the acidic impurities present in industrial gas streams, whereas other hybrid materials fail. This means that they can be effective in carbon capture applications where these impurities are present. Find out more...

Transforming greenhouse gases: New 'supercatalyst' to recycle carbon dioxide and methane

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 08:51:56 EST ~ Engineers have developed a new and cost-effective catalyst to recycle two of the main causes behind climate change -- carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Find out more...

Groundwater depletion could be significant source of atmospheric carbon dioxide

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:26:55 EST ~ Humans may be adding large amounts of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere by using groundwater faster than it is replenished, according to new research. This process, known as groundwater depletion, releases a significant amount of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that has until now been overlooked by scientists in calculating carbon sources, according to the new study. Find out more...

Groundwater recharge in the American west under climate change

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 11:42:16 EST ~ Groundwater recharge in the Western US will change as the climate warms -- the dry southern regions will have less and the northern regions will have more, according to new research. The new study covers the entire US West, from the High Plains states to the Pacific coast, and provides the first detailed look at how groundwater recharge may change as the climate changes. Groundwater is an important source of freshwater, particularly in the West. Find out more...

Climate change impacts already locked in, but the worst can still be avoided

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 10:50:20 EST ~ Some impacts of global warming -- such as sea level rise and coastal flooding -- are already locked in and unavoidable, according to a major research project. Find out more...

Study urges global-change researchers to embrace variability

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 15:36:27 EST ~ A new review article presents evidence that argues for a more nuanced approach to the design of global-change experiments -- one that acknowledges and purposefully incorporates the variability inherent in nature. Find out more...

Pacific Island countries could lose 50 -- 80% of fish in local waters under climate change

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 13:38:53 EST ~ Many Pacific Island nations will lose 50 to 80 percent of marine species in their waters by the end of the 21st century if climate change continues unchecked, finds a new study. This area of the ocean is projected to be the most severely impacted by aspects of climate change. Find out more...

Structure and origins of glacial polish on Yosemite's rocks

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 13:38:50 EST ~ The glaciers that carved Yosemite Valley left highly polished surfaces on many of the region's rock formations. These smooth, shiny surfaces, known as glacial polish, are common in the Sierra Nevada and other glaciated landscapes. Geologists have now taken a close look at the structure and chemistry of glacial polish and found that it consists of a thin coating smeared onto the rock as the glacier moved over it. Find out more...

Off track: How storms will veer in a warmer world

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 12:49:26 EST ~ The dry, semi-arid regions are expanding into higher latitudes, and temperate, rainy regions are migrating poleward. In a new paper, researchers provide new insight into this phenomenon by discovering that mid-latitude storms are steered further toward the poles in a warmer climate. Find out more...