MarineBio Conservation SocietyEndangered Animal News   :: ScienceDaily

New insights into the mechanisms into how ungulates got bigger in the Neogene

Mon, 27 Feb 2017 08:25:32 EST ~ The observed increase of body size in ungulates during the 20 million years before the Pleistocene is driven by the process of species selection, according to researchers. Bigger ungulate species became more common because of a higher origination and lower extinction rate. The study is the first to compare the evolution of two mammalian clades during the Neogene on two continents. The researchers point out that this biogeographic perspective yields complex explanations for apparently shared patterns. Find out more...

Timetree dating in the absence of a fossil record in Asian Horned Frogs

Thu, 23 Feb 2017 11:48:28 EST ~ New research has resolved a 195-year old confusion regarding relationships between the species of Asian Horned Frogs, an enigmatic group of frogs often with horn-like projections over their eyes. Using DNA sequences, they discovered many potentially new species in this group previously unknown to science. Find out more...

Hot spots of marine biodiversity most severely impacted by global warming

Wed, 22 Feb 2017 15:27:37 EST ~ A new study aimed at identifying areas of highest conservation priority in the world's oceans found six 'hot spots of marine biodiversity' that are severely impacted by climate change and fishing pressures. Find out more...

Prides, protection and parks: Africa's protected areas can support four times as many lions

Tue, 21 Feb 2017 13:07:13 EST ~ Africa's protected parks and reserves are capable of supporting three to four times as many wild lions if well funded and managed, according to a new report. The study shows that populations of the African lion and its prey species are drastically below their natural potential inside most of Africa's protected areas (PA). Find out more...

Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins

Tue, 21 Feb 2017 11:07:40 EST ~ Dolphins have been recorded in rarely-seen activities of mother-calf interaction, playing with kelp, and intimate social behaviors like flipper-rubbing through the use of largely non-invasive new cameras. Find out more...

Seven new species of night frogs from India including four miniature forms

Tue, 21 Feb 2017 08:05:04 EST ~ Scientists from India have discovered seven new frog species belonging to the genus Nyctibatrachus, commonly known as Night Frogs. This find is a result of five years of extensive explorations in the Western Ghats global biodiversity hotspot in India. Four out of seven of the new species are miniature-sized frogs (12.2-15.4 mm), which can comfortably sit on a coin or a thumbnail. These are among the smallest known frogs in the world. Find out more...

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 19:06:32 EST ~ Warming seawaters, caused by climate change and extreme climatic events, threaten the stability of tropical coral reefs, with potentially devastating implications for many reef species and the human communities that reefs support. Find out more...

Poaching drives 80 percent decline in elephants in key preserve

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 13:47:18 EST ~ Forest elephant populations in one of Central Africa's largest sanctuaries have declined between 78% and 81% because of poaching, a new study finds. More than 25,000 elephants in Gabon's Minkb National Park may have been killed for their ivory between 2004 and 2014. With nearly half of Central Africa's forest elephants thought to live in Gabon, the loss of elephants from the park is a considerable setback for the preservation of the species. Find out more...

More warm-dwelling animals and plants as a result of climate change

Mon, 20 Feb 2017 08:51:26 EST ~ Since 1980, populations of warm-dwelling species in Germany have increased. The trend is particularly strong among warm-dwelling terrestrial species, as shown by the most comprehensive study across ecosystems in this regard to date. The most obvious increases occurred among warm-dwelling birds, butterflies, beetles, soil organisms and lichens according to a new study. Thus, it appears possible that rising temperatures due to the climate change have had a widespread impact on the population trends of animals in the past 30 years. Find out more...

Egg-free surrogate chickens produced in bid to save rare breeds

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 16:10:16 EST ~ Hens that do not produce their own chicks have been developed for use as surrogates to lay eggs from rare breeds. The advance -- using gene-editing techniques -- could help to boost breeding of endangered birds, as well as improving production of commercial hens, researchers say. Find out more...