MarineBio Conservation SocietyEcology Research News   :: ScienceDaily

5,000 percent increase in native trees on rat-free palmyra atoll

Tue, 17 Jul 2018 14:25:35 EDT ~ New research demonstrates dramatic positive benefits for native trees following rat removal at Palmyra Atoll, a magnificent National Wildlife Refuge and natural research laboratory located about 1000 miles south of Hawaii. For five native tree species, including Pisonia grandis, fewer than 150 seedlings were counted in the presence of rats, and more than 7700 seedlings were counted five years after rats were removed. Find out more...

Protecting tropical forest carbon stocks may not prevent large-scale species loss

Mon, 16 Jul 2018 16:45:20 EDT ~ As the world seeks to curb human-induced climate change, will protecting the carbon of tropical forests also ensure the survival of their species? A study suggests the answer to this question is far from straightforward. Forests with the greatest carbon content do not necessarily house the most species, meaning carbon-focused conservation can miss large swathes of tropical forest biodiversity. Find out more...

Mangroves to mudflats and not back again

Mon, 16 Jul 2018 11:46:13 EDT ~ The long-term conversion of mangroves to mudflats can lead to destabilization of shorelines, negatively impacting their resilience to extreme weather events. Find out more...

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows

Thu, 12 Jul 2018 10:04:57 EDT ~ Off the coast of Cyprus in the Mediterranean Sea, many fish farms have been moved into deeper waters -- and on the seabeds beneath their previous locations, the meadows are flourishing once again. Find out more...

Polyps will let unrelated 'others' fuse to them and share tissue, scientists discover

Thu, 12 Jul 2018 10:04:32 EDT ~ Scientists discovered that polyps have no qualms about treating a nonrelated individual like part of the family. This goes way beyond sharing meals or even a roof. Polyps of the marine hydrozoan Ectopleura larynx allow nonrelated individuals to fuse their bodies to the familial colony and share what is essentially skin and a stomach. Find out more...

Mapping climate corridors

Wed, 11 Jul 2018 18:27:28 EDT ~ The corridors of land vital for many wildlife species in the face of climate change often are unprotected. Now, a recent study has tracked these shifting North American habitats. Find out more...

Eradicate rats to bolster coral reefs

Wed, 11 Jul 2018 13:12:01 EDT ~ New research has confirmed that invasive rats decimate seabird populations, with previously unrecognized consequences for the extensive coral reefs that encircle and protect these islands. Invasive predators such as rats -- which feed on bird eggs, chicks, and even adults birds -- are estimated to have decimated seabird populations within 90 percent of the world's temperate and tropical island groups, but until now the extent of their impact on surrounding coral reefs wasn't known. Find out more...

Success of conservation efforts for important Caribbean Reef fish hinges on climate change

Wed, 11 Jul 2018 09:31:47 EDT ~ Marine scientists predict climate change might severely hinder efforts to protect populations of the endangered and iconic Nassau grouper by the end of this century. Find out more...

If you build it, the birds will come -- if it meets their criteria

Wed, 11 Jul 2018 09:31:42 EDT ~ A new study presents a case study on how bird surveys can better inform conservation and vegetation restoration efforts. Previous conservation methods have emphasized plants as the key to recreating habitat preferred by a sensitive animal. However, this study shows that there's more to the coastal sagebrush habitat of California gnatcatchers than just having the right plants present. Find out more...

Forest ecology shapes Lyme disease risk in the eastern US

Mon, 09 Jul 2018 13:27:27 EDT ~ In the eastern US, risk of contracting Lyme disease is higher in fragmented forests with high rodent densities and low numbers of resident fox, opossum, and raccoons. These are among the findings from an analysis of 19 years of data on the ecology of tick-borne disease in a forested landscape. Find out more...