MarineBio Conservation SocietyEcology Research News   :: ScienceDaily

Hyena population recovered slowly from a disease epidemic

Tue, 20 Nov 2018 12:59:08 EST ~ Infectious diseases can substantially reduce the size of wildlife populations, thereby affecting both the dynamics of ecosystems and biodiversity. Predicting the long-term consequences of epidemics is thus essential for conservation. Researchers have now developed a mathematical model to determine the impact of a major epidemic of canine distemper virus (CDV) on the population of spotted hyenas in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. Find out more...

Hidden giants in forest soils

Mon, 19 Nov 2018 13:31:56 EST ~ Only a fraction of the microbes residing in, on and around soils have been identified through efforts to understand their contributions to global nutrient cycles. Soils are also home to countless viruses that can infect microbes, impacting their ability to regulate these global cycles. Giant virus genomes have been discovered for the first time in a forest soil ecosystem. Find out more...

PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Fri, 16 Nov 2018 14:00:00 EST ~ Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows. Find out more...

Climate change/biodiversity loss: Inseparable threats to humanity that must be addressed together

Thu, 15 Nov 2018 14:49:49 EST ~ Demand for biofuels to fight climate change clouds the future for biodiversity. The demand could cause a 10- to 30-fold expansion of green energy-related agricultural land use, adding crushing pressure on habitat for plants and animals and undermining the essential diversity of species on Earth. Find out more...

Carbon goes with the flow

Tue, 13 Nov 2018 14:17:55 EST ~ Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical -- CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new research adds a dimension to the vertical perspective by showing how water moves massive amounts of carbon laterally through ecosystems -- especially during floods. These findings -- which analyzed more than 1,000 watersheds, covering about 75 percent of the contiguous US -- have implications for climate change and water quality. Find out more...

Misunderstood flying fox could prove bat species demise, warn scientists

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 13:16:24 EST ~ A large fruit-eating bat native to Mauritius is the subject of controversy over the announcement of a major cull to protect the Indian island's fruit crops, despite a lack of evidence as to the extent of damage directly attributed to the endangered species. Monitoring the damage directly caused by the Mauritian flying fox to commercial fruit, researchers found the bat is responsible for only some, and could be managed effectively without the need to cull. Find out more...

It's not trails that disturb forest birds, but the people on them

Mon, 12 Nov 2018 08:24:17 EST ~ The physical presence of trails has less impact on forest birds than how frequently the trails are used by people, finds the first study to disentangle the effect of forest trails from the presence of humans. This is also the case when trails have been used for decades, suggesting that forest birds do not get used to human activity. To minimize disturbance, people should avoid roaming from designated pathways. Find out more...

Mangroves can help countries mitigate their carbon emissions

Fri, 09 Nov 2018 10:14:51 EST ~ Geographers have found that coastal vegetation such as mangroves, seagrasses, and salt marshes may be the most effective habitats to mitigate carbon emissions. Find out more...

Warming waters caused rapid -- and opposite -- shifts in connected marine communities

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:24:26 EST ~ Two connected marine ecosystems -- the Eastern English Channel and Southern North Sea -- experienced big and opposite changes in their fish communities over a 30-year period. Rapid warming drove smaller ocean fishes to shift abruptly northward from one ecosystem to the other. Find out more...

New tool to predict which plants will become invasive

Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:22:08 EST ~ New research provides insight to help predict which plants are likely to become invasive in a particular community. The results showed that non-native plants are more likely to become invasive when they possess biological traits that are different from the native community and that plant height can be a competitive advantage. Find out more...