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Sea urchin spines could fix bones

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 10:37:14 EDT ~ More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. Find out more...

Salmon with side effects: Aquacultures are polluting Chile's rivers with a cocktail of dissolved organic substances

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:45:20 EDT ~ Tasty, versatile, and rich in essential omega-3 fatty acids: salmon is one of the most popular edible fish of all. Shops sell fish caught in the wild, but their main produce is salmon from breeding farms which can pollute rivers, lakes and oceans. Just how big is the problem? Scientists are working to answer this question by examining the dissolved organic compounds which enter Chiles rivers from salmon farms. They warn that these substances are placing huge strain on ecosystems and are changing entire biological communities. Find out more...

430 million-year-old fossil named in honor of Sir David Attenborough

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:23:43 EDT ~ A new 430 million-year-old fossil has been discovered by scientists, and has been named in honor of Sir David Attenborough. The discovery is a unique example of its kind in the fossil record, say the authors of a new report. Find out more...

A new species of hard coral from the World Heritage-listed Lord Howe Island, Australia

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 09:20:18 EDT ~ The discovery of a new species of hard coral, found on Lord Howe Island, suggests that the fauna of this isolated location in the Tasman Sea off south eastern Australia is even more distinct than previously recognized. Even though the World Heritage-listed site has been long known for its biodiversity, the new species is the first coral known to live exclusively in the region. Find out more...

New species of terrestrial crab found climbing on trees in Hong Kong

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 12:25:57 EDT ~ A new species of terrestrial crab has been found to climb trees on the eastern coast of Hong Kong. Its squarish predominantly dark brown carapace and very long slender legs are what sets it apart from closely related species. The discovery of the tiny crustacean once again proves how little is known about the diversity of these crabs in Hong Kong. Find out more...

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 12:25:21 EDT ~ Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone -- a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life -- rather than by ocean warming or acidification. Find out more...

Fish evolve by playing it safe

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 09:26:43 EDT ~ New research supports the creation of more marine reserves in the world's oceans because, the authors say, fish can evolve to be more cautious and stay away from fishing nets. Find out more...

Microorganisms in the subsurface seabed on evolutionary standby

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 14:38:09 EDT ~ Through genetic mutations microorganisms normally have the ability to develop new properties over a short time scale. Researchers now show that microbes in the deep seabed grow in slow motion with generation times of up to 100 years. Find out more...

Current jellyfish sting recommendations can worsen stings

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 09:36:54 EDT ~ Researchers investigated whether commonly recommended first aid actions such as rinsing with seawater or scraping away tentacles lessen the severity of stings from two dangerous box jellyfish species. Their results reveal that some of the most commonly recommended practices actually worsen stings. Find out more...

Microorganisms in the subsurface seabed on evolutionary standby

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 09:36:43 EDT ~ Through genetic mutations microorganisms normally have the ability to develop new properties over a short time scale. Researchers now show that microbes in the deep seabed grow in slow motion with generation times of up to 100 years. Find out more...