MarineBio Conservation SocietyBiodiversity News   :: ScienceDaily

Lack of staffing, funds prevent marine protected areas from realizing full potential

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:32:23 EDT ~ Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular strategy for protecting marine biodiversity, but a new global study demonstrates that widespread lack of personnel and funds are preventing MPAs from reaching their full potential. Only 9 percent of MPAs reported having adequate staff. Find out more...

New species discovered: Protist parasites contribute to the stability of rainforest ecosystems

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 12:38:27 EDT ~ Tropical rainforests are one of the most species-rich areas on earth. Thousands of animal and plant species live there. The smaller microbial protists, which are not visible to the naked eye, are also native to these forests, where they live in the soils and elsewhere. A team of researchers has examined them more closely by analyzing their DNA. They discovered many unknown species, including many parasites, which may contribute to the stability of rainforest ecosystems. Find out more...

From entanglement to invasions of alien species: the harm caused by marine litter

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 08:26:57 EDT ~ Marine litter is a threat to the marine ecosystem, human health and economic activities. A new report sheds light on the many effects of litter in our oceans, and highlights the severity and scale of the issue. The report confirms that plastic items have the highest direct and indirect damaging impact. Find out more...

Extensive ice cap once covered sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 08:24:46 EDT ~ The sub-antarctic island of South Georgia -- famous for its wildlife -- was covered by a massive ice cap during the last ice age, new research indicates. Find out more...

Mating mix-up with wrong fly lowers libido for Mr. Right

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 12:04:54 EDT ~ If you've ever suffered a nightmare date and were hesitant to try again, fruit flies can relate. Female flies that have been coerced into sex by invasive males of the wrong species are less likely to reproduce with their own kind later. Invasive species are known to threaten native biodiversity by bringing in diseases, preying on resident species or outcompeting them for food. But these results show invasives pose a risk through unwelcome advances, too. Find out more...

Only the tip of the iceberg: Monitoring programs underestimate human impact on biodiversity

Thu, 16 Mar 2017 09:29:02 EDT ~ Whether orchids or mammals, insects or slugs and snails: nowadays there are a large number of animals and plants under observation. Unfortunately, the collection of this data began only very recently. The fact that the human impact on biodiversity is likely to be greatly underestimated is the warning sent out by an international research team. Find out more...

How to conserve polar bears -- and maintain subsistence harvest -- under climate change

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 18:23:38 EDT ~ A properly-managed subsistence harvest of polar bears can continue under climate change, according to analysis that combines sea-ice forecasts with a polar bear population model. Find out more...

Where the few jaguars still alive are hiding

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 11:12:18 EDT ~ Researchers track movements of largest feline in Americas across all major Brazilian biomes, using GPS tracking to survey the jaguars home range and movement parameters in each biome. Find out more...

Microbes measure ecological restoration success

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 09:35:30 EDT ~ The success of ecological restoration projects around the world could be boosted using a potential new tool that monitors soil microbes, say scientists. Find out more...

Vicious circle of drought and forest loss in the Amazon

Mon, 13 Mar 2017 08:53:12 EDT ~ Logging that happens today and potential future rainfall reductions in the Amazon could push the region into a vicious dieback circle. If dry seasons intensify with human-caused climate change, the risk for self-amplified forest loss would increase even more, an international team of scientists finds. If however there is a great variety of tree species in a forest patch, according to the study this can significantly strengthen the chance of survival. Find out more...